Sunday, August 3, 2008

Of being "quiet," part II

Always plant a quiet line that critics can damn you with; this proves that they were always hunting for it. - Don Paterson

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It is true, the poem, the poem today, shows - and this has only indirectly to do with difficulties of vocabulary, the faster flow of syntax or a more awakened sense of ellipsis, none of which we should underrate - the poem clearly shows a tendency toward silence. The poem holds its ground, if you will permit me another extreme formulation, the poem holds its ground on its own margin. In order to endure, it constantly calls and pulls itself back from an "already-no-more" into a "still-here." - Paul Celan (tr. Rosmarie Waldrop)

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(Part one is here.)

2 comments:

the unreliable narrator said...

And of course the best part of this post is figuring out how the shrivelled ear lobe (your little planted quiet line) calls and pulls itself back from et cetera.

Sneaky one, you.

the unreliable narrator said...

And of course the best part of this post is figuring out how the shrivelled ear lobe (your little planted quiet line) calls and pulls itself back from et cetera.

Sneaky one, you.