Sunday, January 18, 2009

The narrow road to non-conformity











77 Sunset Strip ["Kookie, Lend Me Your Comb"]

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The Twilight Zone

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Route 66


^

(
detour around The Many Loves of Dobie Gillis)

^

The Outer Limits?

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The Littlest Hobo

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(
detour around Lassie)

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Star Trek


^

(
detour around Lost in Space)

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The Prisoner

^

(
detour around Dr. Who)

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Dark Shadows

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Then Came Bronson


^

(
pit stop at McCloud; Duel)

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Night Gallery

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Mystery Science Theater 3000


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Twin Peaks

^

(
detour around Buffy)

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Xena: Warrior Princess


^

Battlestar Galactica???

^

(
detour around Lost; 24; Mad Men)

. . .

How could I have left out Ernie Kovacs????????????

12 comments:

brian a j salchert said...

Being 68, but essentially having ceased watching television after July of 2002, some of these I am quite familar with and a few I have never seen.

mgushuedc said...

The littlest hobo *rules.* Completely wrecked my heart. What about Mal Sharpe's interview show, The Street People?

Is this why I read the surrealists in high school?

Michael Robbins said...

I'm glad to see you corrected the Galactica typo.

Does this post not make any sense, or is it me?

Don Share said...

I vote for makes no sense.

(Neither, of course, does feeling non-conformist by virtue of watching cult TV shows and/or fetishizing the products of pop culture [which I do like everyone else], but as Montaigne said, what do I know?)

(Possible exception: Lester Bangs. I once suggested to Lindsay Waters at Harvard University Press that an edition of Bangs's work, along the lines of their Benjamin, would be a service to the humanities. Did he take my advice? Of course not!)

To whom did Kookie lend his comb in the end, anyway?

Jordan said...

When does Connie Stevens get her reappraisal, anyway.

Don Share said...

Reappraisal?! Shades of F.R. Leavis...

Ms Baroque said...

Oh God, this takes me back. SO funny!

Of course, I was a complete failure at both. But it's amazing how the issue loses all meaning when you leave the USA.

I think over here you'd be talking in terms of "conventional." But "conformist" is different: sinister, an ism, and more violent. Conform is something matter must be made to do, as opposed to a convention which one may simply observe, however haphazardly, or not.

I thought Mad Men was a bit thin, just a soap dressed up, and unconvincing as to the period (though you'd need the corroboration of some old ladies, and they don't seem to watch that stuff. Disappointing. Moreish though.

Michael Robbins said...

Why can't I just think Battlestar Galactica is awesome? What's the difference between believing it is a great television show & fetishizing it? Who, precisely, thinks that liking this stuff makes them nonconformist?? Monks? And, Jordan, where's my copies of The Hat?

Don Share said...

Hm. Maybe it's awesomeness that's being fetishized. My Occam's razor isn't sharp enough to be sure, however.

The Monks were a great band. Check 'em out.

Michael Robbins said...

I always suspected you were a Cylon!

troylloyd said...

i was born in 1970, i am a teevee tube baby, when i was growing up the telly ran alltha older shows, slow heat of the tube, that perfect vacuum tube, analog warmth.

my narrow path came via an episode of Dragnet, my introduction to French poetry, i've tried & tried to find that episode again, but no luck, alltha Dragnets are titld like "the Big something...", my mythos title calls it "The Big Rimbaud Beatnik Birdkiller", the episode had this highschool kid discovering Rimbaud, Baudelaire et. al., transforming into a beatnik, at one point he squeezed the neck of a bird to kill it, i think he ended up killing his gym teacher! there was recitation of Rimbaud lines, it flipp'd my little lids.

but mostly, it was the cartoons!
late 30's thru mid 50's were a great time for cartoons, Screwy Squirrel will tell you everything you ned to know about modernity, not only were they hipping me to jazz, but all the gags improved my sense of humor:

Screwball Squirrel

Thugs with Dirty Mugs

The cat that hated people

The Old Mill Pond

Betty Boop in "ha! ha! ha!"

Don Share said...

Troy -

Oddly, there's a line in Rimbaud’s "Righteous Man," that goes "Et de sa drague en feu laisse filer les astres !"... rendered by Scott Horton as:

"And from this dragnet of flames it allows stars to shoot."