Sunday, February 8, 2009

The bigot of philosophy

Of all kinds of credulity, the most obstinate and wonderful is that of political zealots; of men, who being numbered, they know not how or why, in any of the parties that divide a state, resign the use of their own eyes and ears, and resolve to believe nothing that does not favour those whom they profess to follow.

The bigot of philosophy is seduced by authorities which he has not always opportunities to examine, is entangled in systems by which truth and falsehood are inextricably complicated, or undertakes to talk on subjects which nature did not form him able to comprehend...

All the knowledge he can want is within his attainment, and most of the arguments which he can hear are within his capacity.

-- Samuel Johnson, ca. 1758

7 comments:

Rory O'Connor said...

Why mention of Zizek? Do you think he fits into Johnson's comment? I tend to think he's very good at acknowledging facts that don't fit his leftism and writes extremely respectfully of conservatives like Eliot, Chesterton and Sloterdijk.

Don Share said...

It's the use to which his work is put that I'm thinking of here. I'm glad for the chance to clarify this, Rory, and I think what you say is true - for which many thanks.

Anonymous said...

Can't say much about this ... but I can say that I liked reading about Mastadon Man very much. Very nice lines.

Rory O'Connor said...

Sorry, I should have figured out from the quote that it would be the followers you were aiming at. Thanks for your patience...

michael robbins said...

I & several other critics should post this above their desks. But you misspelled Bourdieu! How could you misspell the master's naaaaaaaaame!

- A minor Caroline poet of the Caroline period

Don Share said...

Would you believe, Michael, a sticky keyboard??? What would ze Master say about Zat?!?

michael robbins said...

Don, don't give me openings like that. Money on the ground, as Jordan sez.