Wednesday, October 21, 2009

What I love about poetry bloggers


You know what I love about poetry bloggers?

I love that they avoid what is mere rhetoric, or ostentatious ornament, or negligent misuse of terms, or ineffective surplusage, and will be known by their tact of omission, by their skilful economy of means, by their selection and self-restraint, and perhaps above all by that conscious artistic structure which is the expression of mind.

No, really, that's what I love about poetry bloggers!

*
And whadaya know: speculation abounds that soon [sic] almost EVERYBODY will be a published writer:

"Nearly everyone reads. Soon, nearly everyone will publish. Before 1455, books were handwritten, and it took a scribe a year to produce a Bible. Today, it takes only a minute to send a tweet or update a blog. Rates of authorship are increasing by historic orders of magnitude. Nearly universal authorship, like universal literacy before it, stands to reshape society by hastening the flow of information and making individuals more influential.

To quantify our changing reading and writing habits, we plotted the number of published authors per year, since 1400, for books and more recent social media (blogs, Facebook, and Twitter). This is the first published graph of the history of authorship. We found that the number of published authors per year increased nearly tenfold every century for six centuries. By 2000, there were 1 million book authors per year. One million authors is a lot, but they are only a tiny fraction, 0.01 percent, of the nearly 7 billion people on Earth. Since 1400, book authorship has grown nearly tenfold in each century. Currently, authorship, including books and new media, is growing nearly tenfold each year. That’s 100 times faster. Authors, once a select minority, will soon be a majority."





And dig this:


7 comments:

Jordan said...

Yes well.

Bobby said...

Speaking of Wilde, I heard this on the radio the other day (thank you, PF) and thought it was hilarious in about six different ways:

"He taught in London and then left for a lecture tour of North America. He'd been invited by the producer of Gilbert and Sullivan's new comic opera, Patience, a work that made fun of the Aesthetic Movement. The show had done well in New York City and was due to go on tour, but the producer wasn't sure if people around America would be familiar with the thing about which the opera was poking fun. The producer hoped Wilde's lectures would familiarize the nation with the Aesthetic Movement so that they'd all get the jokes in Patience, Gilbert and Sullivan's opera."

Don Share said...

Great stuff, Bobby, thanks!

I never listen to that show (so maybe, pace Kent's ethical hydroponics on DE, I only have to give up part of my salary).

Joseph Hutchison said...

The hierarchy is wonderful. The chart less so, because it treats book, blog, Facebook, and Twitter authors as discrete categories; but of course they overlap, so the relative percentages aren't statistically valid. When a real statistician gets around to this question, he or she will also have to add another category: people who write blog comments. I'm convinced there is a Ph.D thesis in the analysis of these comments, as there has been in the analysis of marginalia....

Kent Johnson said...

I had to look up "hydroponics" on Wikipedia!

Thanks for the new word, Don.

(Though I never said anyone should give back any of their salary!)

All love to the good works of the Poetry Foundation.

Henry Gould said...

"I love that they avoid what is mere rhetoric, or ostentatious ornament, or negligent misuse of terms, or ineffective surplusage, and will be known by their tact of omission, by their skilful economy of means, by their selection and self-restraint, and perhaps above all by that conscious artistic structure which is the expression of mind."

Is this from Henry James, or something? I believe the great & lasting poems, from Homer on, have been written in a kind of trance. "Conscious artistic structure" is something you learn in elementary school, unconsciously (maybe listening to music).

(I'm exaggerating...)

Don Share said...

Bobby nailed it - it's from Wilde, Henry! I think you're right about elem. skool.

While I'm writing, thank you for the books and esp. the CD. I'm enjoying them very much & may gather enough nerve to burn you a CD of my own, literally recorded in a garage yrs. ago!